Author Topic: References - The Human Figure  (Read 11328 times)

Offline Vermis

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References - The Human Figure
« on: March 04, 2010, 10:53:08 PM GMT GMT »
Online Sources

Anatomy for Sculptors - anatomy guides and sculpting tips.

Fitstep Muscular Anatomy

Learn to Draw the Human Figure

Muscle Map Turntable - youtube video

Books

Anatomy and Drawing
Victor Perard

Anatomy for the Artist
Sarah Simblet

Anatomy for Artists
Vinciana Leonardo Collection

Dynamic Anatomy
Dynamic Figure Drawing

Burne Hogarth

Figure Drawing For All It's Worth
Successful Drawing
Drawing The Head And Hands

Andrew Loomis

Living Anatomy
R. D. Lockhart

Apps

Android:

3D Anatomy
« Last Edit: April 02, 2014, 11:10:09 PM BST GMT by Vermis »

Offline Justin

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Re: References - The Human Figure
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2010, 01:06:07 PM GMT GMT »
I'd add dynamic Wrinkles and Drapery to the Hogarth selection, it's pretty much the bible for min cloth!

Offline Vermis

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Re: References - The Human Figure
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2010, 05:04:10 PM GMT GMT »
Yup. ;D  I was going to post it up somewhere, but I dunno if it strictly falls under 'The Human Figure'.
Does it warrant a sticky all to itself?  Are there any other cloth references or guides out there?

Offline Justin

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Re: References - The Human Figure
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2010, 01:10:38 PM GMT GMT »
If there are I've yet to find a good one!
I'd sick it in with the other hogarth references, just for completeness!

Offline Vermis

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Re: References - The Human Figure
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2010, 06:38:46 PM GMT GMT »
Fair enough. :)  We can split it up if (when?) things expand round here.

Offline Justin

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Re: References - The Human Figure
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2010, 02:11:27 PM BST GMT »
Found this - http://www.fitstep.com/Advanced/Anatomy/Anatomy.htm accidentally today through random googleness!

It's technically a fitness site (I know, I know. The bane of most of us) but has some good data on how the muscle groups work which could prove useful.

Offline hivetrygon

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Re: References - The Human Figure
« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2010, 03:13:13 PM BST GMT »
I'd add Riven Phoniex to that list. While learning to draw he helps a lot with anatomy and mathmatical ways to create the figure. It's helped me quite a bit. I admit I've only watched a few parts, to busy right now, but it teaches you ratios of the body. It also taught me my body is aparently well beyond normal standards as nothing even come close to matching. I must have short legs long arms and a long torso.  :-\
http://www.alienthink.com/

Offline PhilH

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Re: References - The Human Figure
« Reply #7 on: May 14, 2010, 06:07:54 PM BST GMT »
I got these links some time ago from a various sources, might be useful. I mainly refer to anatomy books and magazines.

http://www.fineart.sk/

http://www.posemaniacs.com/?p=40

http://digicoll.library.wisc.edu/Science/subcollections/VetAnatImgsAbout.html


Offline Bodhi

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Re: References - The Human Figure
« Reply #8 on: May 14, 2010, 07:43:57 PM BST GMT »
My favourite book is "Anatomy and Drawing" by Victor Perard. Been used in art schools since 1955. It is without text (waste of space) but crammed with very detailed breaking down of all parts of the skeleton and all musclegroups.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2010, 07:46:04 PM BST GMT by Bodhi »

Offline Bork

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Re: References - The Human Figure
« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2010, 10:51:46 PM BST GMT »
My favourite book is "Anatomy and Drawing" by Victor Perard. Been used in art schools since 1955. It is without text (waste of space) but crammed with very detailed breaking down of all parts of the skeleton and all musclegroups.

I googled the title and found it here:

http://www.scribd.com/doc/2893686/Drawing-and-Anatomy-by-Victor-Perard

Here's another book on that site about figurative sculpture. Large scale, but interesting nonetheless:

http://www.scribd.com/doc/28378246/Modeling-the-Figure-in-Clay-Bruno-Lucchesi


Offline Vermis

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Re: References - The Human Figure
« Reply #10 on: May 16, 2010, 05:00:26 PM BST GMT »
I saw fineart.sk and posemaniacs before I started this thread, but I was a bit wary about including them.

The most useful stuff on fineart IMO - the Loomis Books - I already linked to.  Most of the rest seems to be none-too-extensive free samples ripped from elsewhere (in the case of the Simblet Anatomy samples, the latter half are from other sources and the real ones are far from representative of the book).  Overall it looks almost like a front for a portal to the subscription sites listed; and the seedy infomercial style and subscribers' examples (particularly this one on the comic site) put me right off, personally.  Obviously it depends on what the individual artist gets out of it, and it'd be less of an issue for sculpture (I think), but they look like they're encouraging photochoppery and Greg Land tracing way too strongly, compared to simple reference.

Posemaniacs would be good for - well, poses - but the musculature consists of flat texture maps, that in some cases don't follow the shape of the 3D model.  In my opinion it'd be a much better resource if they were monochrome, like shop dummies or something.

But I'll stick them in if I'm shouted down enough.  And on that note, don't forget that you can all post reviews of and discuss references and guides outside this thread, in the, uh... references and guides board.

And the vet images are already in the animal anatomy thread. ;)

Scribd is tempting.  I've used it and Google Books before, but TBH I'd rather people support the authors and go buy the books (Eventually.  If they can.), than rely on the 'free' books wholesale.  No pun intended.
In any case I think enough people would know about those sites to go look up the book list themselves.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2010, 05:04:43 PM BST GMT by Vermis »

Offline Andrew May

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Re: References - The Human Figure
« Reply #11 on: August 04, 2010, 02:43:42 PM BST GMT »

By andrewjohnmay at 2010-08-04

I found this yesterday, I forgot that I had it! I highly recommend tracking it down.  ;D

For anyone interested here's the rest of my collection.

By andrewjohnmay at 2010-08-04

Offline Vermis

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Re: References - The Human Figure
« Reply #12 on: August 16, 2010, 04:04:48 PM BST GMT »
Added!  I hope I got the publisher right.

That mini-library looks big compared to my own; and I'm getting rid of some. :S  I did find a couple more books that I might stick up here soon, though.

Offline Vermis

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Re: References - The Human Figure
« Reply #13 on: January 13, 2011, 01:38:58 PM GMT GMT »
Added the alienthink link (sorry Ed, dunno how I missed it for seven months!)* but with reservations.  The first one comes from the 'ultimate figure drawing course known to man, period' claim, especially when the face further down the page doesn't like the product of a master teacher.  The next, from looking up the site on conceptart.  A lot of names there aren't too excited by it.

Still, looks like it's helped a lot of people too, so up it goes.  With the caveat that it maybe shouldn't be used in isolation. :)

*While I'm at it, apologies to Bodhi too, for missing the Perard reference.

Offline Vermis

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Re: References - The Human Figure
« Reply #14 on: January 21, 2012, 11:02:29 PM GMT GMT »
Rebuilt the first post.  Is it me or is it a little sparse?  I'm not sure if I forgot anything.