Author Topic: Help with Apoxie Sculpt  (Read 2612 times)

Offline paintpig

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Help with Apoxie Sculpt
« on: July 04, 2014, 03:21:57 PM BST GMT »
So for my first real post

I have been on the hunt looking at different putties and epoxies and I came across this Apoxie Sculpt in the only real specialist store in town. I did a search and couldn't find anything about it on the forum, has anyone bought or tried this medium? It is manufactured by Aves in the US. It has a working time of approximately 1 to 1.5 hours and seems to be a bit like Milliput in that it can be smoothed and washed off hands with water.

At the moment my main weapon of choice (for the very little sculpting I have done) is GS and a lil bit of BS, I can source procreate but I might wait a bit before I give it a try. Fimo is notoriously hard to get locally although Sculpy seems to be everywhere  ...like a rash.

Basically I'm buying small quantities of each medium and having a go, so to speak, I quite like using green and brown stuff and I'm looking forward to giving the polymer clays a try out particularly when it comes to faces  ...I need all the time I can get.

Sorry there was a link about it or something similar http://minisculpture.co.uk/index.php?topic=1636.0, as for the naming ....ebay is notorious for it's users linking up names of multiple products to get a hit on search engines

Oddity

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Re: Help with Apoxie Sculpt
« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2014, 07:29:36 PM BST GMT »
I know sculptor Drew Williams uses the Aves product mixed with GS. Try hitting him up on FB as I know he's very open about his trade and doesn't mind sharing his expertise and experience! :)

https://www.facebook.com/SatyrStudio?hc_location=timeline

Offline Ninja_Butler

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Re: Help with Apoxie Sculpt
« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2014, 09:30:48 PM BST GMT »
My experience is that at least in small-scale miniatures (32m scale) using a different medium won't improve the result or be easier to work with. You just have to practice, practice, practice. I'm surprised you can't find any Fimo, it's very common where I live, you should be able to find it in any art/stationery supplies shop.

I've got some Apoxie, can't say I get on with it very well, it's kind of... I dunno.. crumbly? It's hard to describe. I think I've gotten so used to the stretchiness of Kneadatite it's hard for me to adapt to a different medium. If you do buy some, it lasts a lot longer than Greenstuff. I don't know if you've noticed but GS can start to go off after just a few months.

I've tried Procreate and I would say it probably is superior to GS so If and when I get good enough at sculpting I may switch over to Procreate, but for the time being I am mainly sticking with GS.

Offline paintpig

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Re: Help with Apoxie Sculpt
« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2014, 02:28:22 AM BST GMT »
Locally Sculpy has firmly knocked Fimo off the shelves Ninja, very effective marketing push no doubt. I suspect that a very large percentage of users would be in the craft and beading school.

I cant say that I enjoy using the Apoxie, the tiny bit I have tried but I think it will be fine for flat sheet crates etc, things that I can work after curing to make gun carriages planking etc.  I will twist a bit in with my GS next time I'm mixing a ball, my GS is starting to feel a bit old maybe the Apoxie will give it a few more months.

Offline Ninja_Butler

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Re: Help with Apoxie Sculpt
« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2014, 09:41:32 AM BST GMT »
Unless you're low on cash just buy some fresh GS, it's so much easier to work with when it's fresh.

Offline Vermis

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Re: Help with Apoxie Sculpt
« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2014, 04:35:46 PM BST GMT »
Ooh yeah. I use apoxie sculpt a lot, and so do a number of other miniature hobbyists and sculptors. You're right that it's like milliput - it's one of what I call 'claylike' putties, as opposed to elastic, 'chewing gum' putties like green stuff. It behaves, as the term suggests, a lot like clay. It is a bit 'crumbly' (though that description always makes it sound like old toast, to my mind) and tears rather than stretching like elastic stuff. It's very mildly water-soluble like milliput, which allows water to be used as a tool lubricator as well as easy washup.
However, it's got some differences to milliput too. It's developed for sculpting rather than plumbing repairs, so it is more user friendly, especially to beginner sculptors. (though 'developed for plumbers' shouldn't be a pejorative - GS had the same origin, and I still like that and milliput meself) It's less sticky, a little less water-soluble (and messy), and has a finer 'crumb' or grain than standard milliput, and most of the other milliput varieties IIRC. Kind of a powdery or waxy feeling. It's also much softer and more malleable when freshly mixed, and personally that's where I think it runs into problems: in my opinion freshly-mixed apoxie sculpt can be too soft and fragile for sculpting the kind and size of details on 28mm (or smaller) minis. The pale shade and slight translucency of the standard colour can also cause problems at those scales.
That can be worked around by allowing the material to cure and firm up for a while (it's got a nice long working window too) to what IMO is a pretty good and pleasant consistency. Though what I almost always do myself is to mix apoxie sculpt with an elastic putty, usually green stuff. A little green stuff mixed into a mass of apoxie sculpt will help bind it together, thanks to the former's elastic qualities. (and if you're making something that needs a 'mass' of putty, it's a bit more cost-effective than pure green stuff!) Not to mention colouring the putty and making it more opaque. On the other hand, a little apoxie sculpt mixed into a ball of green stuff will 'loosen' the sometimes over-firm, springy texture. It'll also make the green stuff a little harder after curing, for carving, scraping or sanding. And yup, it gives older green stuff a bit more shelf life. ;)

Also, like I mentioned in one or other A-sculpt topic, it's also quite similar to other putties on the market; mostly notable magic sculp (though I know others who can spot differences) but also the lesser-known cold clay and (probably) A-sculpt itself.

Regarding sculpey and fimo: are you looking for polymer clay? What's your particular beef with sculpey? What are the types you can find locally - just the ubiquitous sculpey III, or other varieties?
« Last Edit: July 15, 2014, 04:38:39 PM BST GMT by Vermis »